Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Corners of old Nairobi

I was driving toward Upper Hill on a bit of a muddy track/rat run because, as usual - traffic was horrendous and I was in a hurry - when I drove past this old house...


I couldn't resist taking a closer look. 


Look at the threatening crane overhead - not sure how much longer this house will be left standing!





It looks like it could be in Surrey if it weren't for the bougainvillea around the balcony and the two beautiful palm trees behind.  There were holes in the roof - a bit like our house then!  I think that it's such a shame that these old buildings are not listed here.

7 comments:

My Africa Is Showing said...

There used to be so many old homes like that in Upper Hill, Kileleshwa, Kilimani, Loresho, and a few other surburbs when I was in high school(less than 10 years ago). It breaks my heart to think that one day there will be nothing of the old suburban Nairobi.

Anonymous said...

Hey I was just reading through your blog, it's great to read about your lives in kenya! My name is Efflyn, I'm born and rasied in Sweden but my parents are originally from Kenya! I was just wondering wether you are in need of an aupair/babysitter?
Kind Regards
Efflyn

Anonymous said...

They are just knocking anything old down without a care - money, money, money that's all these people think about.

Anonymous said...

I completely agree. Everyone is scrambling to put up apartments, offices etc... soon Nairobi will have no history left. Not to mention that these are probably the only houses in Nairobi that have actually been built properly. I am lucky enough to live in an old house like this but as offices and town houses start encrouching on us who knows how long the owner will resist the pressure....

Anonymous said...

awww cute !!! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17386894

Telegraph Tea Room Garden School said...

Wow! You are right about the Surrey comparison. Look at the chimney! We should get something going, like "Saving old Homes in Africa" hmm, although I'm not sure it would take off! BUT, there is a good reason, they are going to become rare finds in the future. Shame.

Anonymous said...

It's a pity indeed. I am Kenyan but right now I live in a small New England town in the U.S. incorporated in 1705. In my nieghbourhood, there are historic homes marked with a placard of the year they were built. Some are more than a hundred years old. In most places, renovations have to try and preserve the style of build as much as possible even as they modernise the buildings. Most are built of wood BTW!

It breaks my heart that we in Kenya seem to care not about these historic buildings! Most are built of stone which is more durable than wood. With the proper upkeep, they shouldn't need to be knocked down. Those with great historical significance should be turned into museums. I have noticed high rise apartments spring up everywhere in the city. I feel that part of the charm of the city is lost, and the character as well. All these additions are very cookie-cutter, and poorly built!

Sue